Copper in the A. E. Seaman Mineral Museum

Michigan Technological University


NOTE:Click on any image to see a larger, higher quality image.

Copper crystals from the Cliff mine,
Keweenaw County, Michigan. Largest crystal is 2 cm.
John T. Reeder Collection #1680.
John A. Jaszczak photo.

Elongated tetrahexahedral copper crystals
from the Cliff mine, Keweenaw County, Michigan.
John T. Reeder Collection #551.
John A. Jaszczak photo.

The most commonly occurring forms for copper in the Lake Superior Copper district are tetrahexahedra.

Copper crystal (2 cm) showing a combination
of tetrahexahedron and dodecahedron forms.
From the Quincy mine, Houghton County, Michigan.
John T. Reeder Collection #1642.
John A. Jaszczak photo.

Immense copper crystal (14 pounds) with a
hoppered, predominantly dodecahedral form.
From Point Prospect, Keweenaw, Michigan.
John A. Jaszczak photo.

Copper crystals from the Lake Superior Copper district frequently form twins by reflection and composition on {111} planes. Due to growth distorion of some twins, the crystals resemble bear paws and are known as Bearpaw Twins.

Remarkable group (12-cm across) of copper crystals,
many twinned form.
Phoenix mine, Keweenaw County, Michigan.
This specimen is from the L. L. Hubbard collection #440,
and was featured in the 2nd edition of the Encyclopedia of Minerals
Photo by .

Very sharp, octahedral copper crystal,
(1.6 cm) twinned on {111}. Octahedral crystals of copper
are very rare in the Lake Superior Copper District.
From the White Pine Mine, Ontonagon County, Michigan.
John A. Jaszczak photo.

Copper crystals showing dominant cube form
with hopper faces.
D.C. Gabriel Collection #1111
From Ahmeek mine, Keweenaw County, Michigan.
John A. Jaszczak photo.

DM21706. Copper crystals showing dominant cube form.
From White Pine mine, Ontonagon County, Michigan.
John A. Jaszczak photo.


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